Category Archives: julian worker

Pincher Martin by William Golding

William Golding won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1983. His first novel, Lord of the Flies, is probably his best known work.

Pincher Martin is on a navy vessel escorting a North Atlantic convoy during WWII. His ship is torpedoed and sinks, but Martin is the sole survivor and ends up on a rock on his own in the middle of the ocean. The book is entirely set on this rock.

He is exposed and isolated surrounded by the sea, the sun, the cold and his evident isolation. He is injured, he is hungry, but it’s his thoughts that are the most terrifying as he remembers incidents from his past that he regrets and perhaps wishes he’d handled differently. He organises a pool of rainwater for drinking and eats shellfish which give him food poisoning. He gives names to features of the rock to make it homely, but there’s no escape from himself.

Some thoughts…

For you from some of my recent magazine reading.

A paradox of freedom

The more people’s choices expand, the more human beings demand a stable space in which to make them. When this is threatened security eclipses liberty, for if order in society can no longer be relied on freedom has little value.

The lesson of the pandemic is that most people will welcome an extension of state power if they think it will keep them safe.

Continuity of Care

In August, the British Journal of General Practice published the largest ever study conducted into continuity of care. Researchers at the University of Bergen had analysed the health records of 4.5 million people – almost the entire population of Norway – and looked at what patients derive from a long-standing relationship with their GP.

Patients who’d had the same family doctor for many years were:

30 percent less likely to use out-of-hours services

30 per cent less likely to be admitted to hospital as an emergency

25 per cent less likely to die

than people registered with their GP for under a year.

The risk of emergency care or dying began to decrease once patients had been with their doctor for as little as two years and continued to fall steadily thereafter.

This ‘dose-response’ relationship (in which the more you have of something, the more you benefit) strongly implies causality. Knowing and being known by your GP really is good for your health.

Billionaire Wealth Surge from the Institute for Policy Studies

$5.5 trillion – Increase in the wealth of the world’s 2,690 billionaires from March 2020 – July 2021.

$4.4 trillion – what it would cost to give a one-off $20,000 cash grant to all currently unemployed workers in the world.

Pincher Martin by William Golding

William Golding won the Nobel Prize for literature in 1983. His first novel, Lord of the Flies, is probably his best known work.

Pincher Martin is on a navy vessel escorting a North Atlantic convoy during WWII. His ship is torpedoed and sinks, but Martin is the sole survivor and ends up on a rock on his own in the middle of the ocean. The book is entirely set on this rock.

He is exposed and isolated surrounded by the sea, the sun, the cold and his evident isolation. He is injured, he is hungry, but it’s his thoughts that are the most terrifying as he remembers incidents from his past that he regrets and perhaps wishes he’d handled differently. He organises a pool of rainwater for drinking and eats shellfish which give him food poisoning. He gives names to features of the rock to make it homely, but there’s no escape from himself.

A rhyming love poem to Xi Jinping and/or the Chinese Communist Party to thank them for hosting the Olympic Games.

In this Fanstory contest , I had to write a rhyming love poem to Xi Jinping and/or the Chinese Communist Party to thank them for hosting the Olympic Games.

Obviously, this is an absurd idea and so the only way for me to do this was to write in the style of William McGonagall

In the year 2022 the Olympics of the Winter took place in Beijing,

Thanks to the wonderful person Xi Jinping

The President of the People’s Republic of China

Than which no country is finer

Organised the greatest of Games

And the most beautiful and incandescent of flames

Thanks to Xi

And the Chinese Communist Party

Skiers, skaters, lugers, and bob sleighers, according to the sages,

Showed off their skills on the greatest of stages

Thanks to Xi

Who will always rank XI out of X with me

These were the best Olympics of all time

The viewing figures were sublime

Thank you to the people of China

Than which no people are finer

For putting on the greatest show

Amongst the most beautiful ice and purest snow

====================

Julian Worker was born in Leicester, attended school in Yorkshire, and university in Liverpool. He has been to 94 countries and territories and intends to make the 100 in the next four years. He writes travel books and murder / mysteries with over 25 now in print. He likes to include humour and dialogue in his work. 

His latest book is about a Buddhist cat who tries to help his squirrel friend fly further from a
children’s slide.

Some thoughts…

For you from some of my recent magazine reading.

A paradox of freedom

The more people’s choices expand, the more human beings demand a stable space in which to make them. When this is threatened security eclipses liberty, for if order in society can no longer be relied on freedom has little value.

The lesson of the pandemic is that most people will welcome an extension of state power if they think it will keep them safe.

Continuity of Care

In August, the British Journal of General Practice published the largest ever study conducted into continuity of care. Researchers at the University of Bergen had analysed the health records of 4.5 million people – almost the entire population of Norway – and looked at what patients derive from a long-standing relationship with their GP.

Patients who’d had the same family doctor for many years were:

30 percent less likely to use out-of-hours services

30 per cent less likely to be admitted to hospital as an emergency

25 per cent less likely to die

than people registered with their GP for under a year.

The risk of emergency care or dying began to decrease once patients had been with their doctor for as little as two years and continued to fall steadily thereafter.

This ‘dose-response’ relationship (in which the more you have of something, the more you benefit) strongly implies causality. Knowing and being known by your GP really is good for your health.

Billionaire Wealth Surge from the Institute for Policy Studies

$5.5 trillion – Increase in the wealth of the world’s 2,690 billionaires from March 2020 – July 2021.

$4.4 trillion – what it would cost to give a one-off $20,000 cash grant to all currently unemployed workers in the world.