The Frisby Waterless Murders – 39

Excerpt from the book called The Frisby Waterless Murders

“Patricia was served with tea around 9:45 a.m. and then when the smoke came in she left for the kitchen/dining car along with Peter Johnston.”

 

“Just like everyone else; it sounds so well ordered – rather than a stampede for fresh air there was a leisurely walk to take tea in the dining car. I don’t believe people can show this much self control,” sighed Knowles, “do you believe this?”

 

“It’s almost as though they were expecting it, isn’t it? Like it was planned?” said Barnes.

 

“Yes, what did Mrs Cridge say in Seat 20, Sergeant?”

 

“She arrived at 9:20 a.m. along with Mr Yeung and when the Major was relocated she and Mr Yeung welcomed him and made sure he was comfortable. She had some coffee around 9:50 a.m. and then they headed to the kitchen/dining car when the smoke came in…”

 

“…etcetera etc…I wonder what order people arrived in the kitchen/dining car?” asked Knowles.

 

“I suppose we could ask one of the stewards, who was in the dining car?” suggested Barnes.

 

“Yes, let’s ask the stewards and Gerald too, and Linda can ask people the order they think they arrived in the dining car when she phones them tomorrow.”

 

“So people will have to remember two things; whether they shook the Major’s hand and in which order they arrived in the dining car?” said Smythe.

 

“That’s it, Linda, in particular I think we need to know whether Desmond Stellen arrived last of all or whether someone else arrived after him. At the moment, he’s the only person who’s admitted to arriving in the dining car on his own after the smoke came in – Marie Stellen was already there of course.”

 

“Right, so he’s in position A to fire a dart at the Major and not have anyone see him do it; in fact he could just jab the Major in the neck as he was passing,” said Barnes

 

“But where was the Major’s wife when all this was happening?” asked Smythe.

 

“Sitting beside him, presumably, but you can find that out tomorrow when you go and see her, can’t you?” said Knowles.

 

“A big question for her,” said Barnes.

 

“I just hope she can remember things clearly for the benefit of all of us.”

 

“There seems to be a lot resting on her replies to our questions,” said Smythe, “where will you be going, sir, whilst we visit Mrs Harkness?”